Review: Diamondback Wack

Another Gilly’s review (you think they’d be a sponsor of mine by now or something) – and a quick one at that. Diamondback Brewing Company is Baltimore based and has been brewing since 2013. They’re based out of a handsome brick building in the Locust Point area of the city, just off of I-95. And yet I haven’t visited them so far. We’ll have to change that.

Their standard brewing lineup favors IPAs and pale ales, but they definitely went outside of their comfort zone with Wack. This is a weird one: a black gose (which I will admit that I had never heard of before). A black gose’s signature color is dark and this comes from the malts used to brew it. In the case of Diamondback Wack, these are Midnight Wheat and Dark Chocolate Malts. The hops used are Ella (which I’m not really familiar with), and the yeasts are a house yeast for Diamonbdack as well as additional lactic acid.

IMG_3434

I had a 10oz pour this particular Monday. It was a deep, dark brown color with a hint of ruby hue to it. There’s not-quite-a-finger of tan head, which vanishes quickly.  I didn’t get much of a nose off of this, probably because it was very cold. There might be a slightly zingy and sour smell and – I know that this sounds odd – I could swear that it smells slightly salted.

It’s malty for a few moments up front, roasty but not sweet at all. There’s a great deal of complexity in this beer. Diamondback’s website says it’s brewed with coriander, which is part of the nutty, layered flavors. It’s very sour. It has a nice pucker punch to it. The salty finish is also pleasantly strong, which is a great taste for a gose – very signature of this beer style. Even when I lick my lips after, they’re still sour and salty tasting. This is a style of beer that I love and this was a really good example of what I think it can be should be.

Advertisements

Review: Jailbreak Ryemin’ and Stealin’

What can I say? I’m a sucker for rye. I like me some rye beers and some rye whiskey (especially in a well-balanced Manhattan). There’s a spiciness that the grain adds to the beverages it goes into. It adds a kind of depth that is very appealing to my palate!

I didn’t use to like lighter beers. They scared me. I’d had an aggresively hoppy IPA early in my beer-drinking days, and it put me off them for years. Eventually, I got bold and decided to work them into my beer rotation – but I wasn’t ready to go all in yet. So I started with black IPAs and rye beers and IPAs. I couldn’t tell you what my first one was, but I know that I liked it and that it lured me back over and away from my safe zone of porters and stouts.

Jailbreak Ryemin and Stealin 002

This was another pint at my beloved Gilly’s. This beer pours a handsome ruby brown with a small, off-white head that quickly vanishes, but does leave a little lacing behind. Perhaps because it was poured pretty cold, I couldn’t really get any nose off of this beer. I was also chatting with a friend over drinks, so I didn’t spend too long huffing my beer like a total weirdo. This time.

Jailbreak Ryemin and Stealin 001

The taste of Jailbreak Ryemin’ and Stealin’ is all resin and pine and caramel malt up front. There’s that pleasant rye and spice flavor that lingers and warms the tongue. It has a slightly dry finish, but is relatively clean; it doesn’t linger overmuch. There is definitely some dry pine on the back end.

As far as rye beers go, I feel like this one is pretty balanced with a sweet enough malt backbone to hold up to the rye and pine flavors that it brings to the table.

 

 

Review: Duclaw Gingerbread Euforia

Another pint (okay, 10oz pour, technically) at my old watering hole, Gilly’s! I sometimes have appointments in the area of it and a good friend works nearby – when I’m in Rockville and she can get away for a long lunch, we meet for a beer and a chat. This was one such day and, I’ll admit, these are some of my favorite afternoons when I can make them happen.

DuClaw Gingerbread Euforia 001

My friend is all about the IPAs, but I opted for something a little different. This beer was a golden-hued, rich brown with honey undertones. No real head on this pour, but there was a hint of lacing.

It had a good bit of dessert-like sweetness to it with some spices mixed in. I get cinnamon and ginger from it. It smells like baking cookies at Christmas time. There’s big  gingerbread flavor here! There’s a slightly bitter aftertaste, though, which is throwing me off. Maybe it’s the beer or maybe it’s some lines that need cleaning – but I know Gilly’s to be really diligent about keeping their system clean, so I suspect it’s the beer. Not sure I’d buy it again.

Review: Gilly’s Craft Beer & Fine Wine

Disclaimer: Gilly’s used to be My Bar. Capital M, capital B. Mine. I lived about a 10 minute walk from it and went there way more than is probably healthy, both to drink and to write (while drinking). I don’t live there any longer, but I still always stop by for a pint when I’m in the area. So I’m probably biased toward the place, but it had several years to really win my affection.

They’re both a bottle shop and a beer and wine bar with 19 rotating taps. Additionally, they sell genuinely delicious sandwiches and cheese plates if you feel like snacking (although the sandwiches here are for more than a mere snack – they’re significant). The staff is always knowledgeable about their beers, and even just beer in general, and always give out plenty of sample tastes upon request.

oliver-intrigue-in-tangiers-001

Last year, they joined up with Untappd and became a verified venue and now use a large screen TV and Untappd software to keep a live list of their beer menu. Gone are the days of printed menus and sharpie lines through the kegs that had kicked! If you check in at Gilly’s using Untappd, your user name and icon appear on the screen as well – a sort of digital territory marking for beer nerds, I guess.

I started with a spiced beer, Oliver’s Intrigue in Tangiers. I asked a little about it and learned that this brew was a collaboration between Oliver Brewing Company and Charm City Meadworks, both Baltimore local businesses. This beer is “brewed with orange blossom honey and gently spiced with nutmeg, cinnamon, coriander and star anise.”

It pours a nice ruby brown color with a little off-white head that falls quickly and leaves lacing behind in its wake. I noticed very little nose, perhaps because the pour was so cold. Maybe I get a hint of a citrus smell, but I didn’t notice any spices on the nose.

The first taste is a brown ale with a slight peppercorn hint at the back of the throat. It’s lightly sweet, but not too malty. I’d say that there’s a slight tartness to it. I don’t find it at all dry or bitter and there’s a sort of heat to it that feels alcoholic. The drier finish becomes more apparent as this beer warms. It’s light and crisp with low carbonation. Easy to drink, but not as remarkable or distinct as other spiced beers I’ve tried.

I also splurged on a 10oz pour of a $16 sour beer from Belgium. The Brouwerji Alvinne Cuvee Freddy was a treat. It pours a beautiful, dark brown, ruddy color, quite opaque. No head at all on this pour. It has a really sour and funky smell to it and the taste is an amazing puckery sour! Honestly, it’s one of the best sours I may have every had – and for that price, it better be!

brouwerij-alvinne-cuvee-freddy-001

Photo by @stunim of Instagram